Information On How To Transplant Wisteria Vines

Information On How To Transplant Wisteria Vines

By: Jackie Rhoades

Nothing compares to the beauty of a wisteria plant in bloom. Those springtime clusters of pale, purple flowers can create a gardener’s dream or — if it’s in the wrong place, a gardener’s nightmare. Perhaps you didn’t realize just how big a wisteria can grow or perhaps its placement no longer suits your current garden plan. You’re thinking about how to transplant a wisteria. It’s a daunting thought. Transplanting wisteria is no walk in the garden, but it can be done.

When is the Best Time to Transplant Wisteria

The downside of transplanting wisteria that is well established is that it may take several years for the vine to bloom again. The best time to transplant wisteria is in the late fall or early spring when the plant is dormant, but the soil is workable. Choose your site carefully. You don’t want to do this again!

How to Transplant Wisteria Vines

Cut the vine back to about 3 feet (1 m.) tall. Start digging about 18 to 24 inches (45.5 to 61 cm.) from the stem. To successfully transplant wisteria, you must dig deep. Continue digging and prying in a circle around your transplant.

Wisteria doesn’t like to be moved, so take up as large of a root ball as possible. The more root with its original soil, the greater chance of success in transplanting wisteria. Place the root ball on a tarp and drag it to its new location.

When you’re ready to transplant wisteria, dig the new hole to twice the size of the root ball. Mix the soil from the hole with up to 50 percent compost or leaf mold to provide the best new home for your transplant. Wisteria do best in fertile soil with lots of sun. The best time to transplant wisteria is early morning or evening. Stake the vine immediately. Water well and keep your fingers crossed.

Transplanting wisteria can be difficult and back-breaking, but knowing how to transplant wisteria properly will increase your chances of success. Good luck and good digging!

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Transplanting Wisteria Plants - How To Transplant Wisteria Vines - garden

Wisteria is a beautiful vine that is hardy in USDA zones 4 through 9. It is one of my favorite vine plants. Depending on the variety you choose, some wisterias have scented purple flowers. Wisteria is a deciduous vine, meaning that the leaves drop off in the fall. There are two species of wisteria vines: The Chinese wisteria and Japanese wisteria. Often times, wisteria will send out suckers. If you want another wisteria to grow in a different part of your yard, don't go to a garden supply store or order one online. You can dig the shoots or suckers out of the ground. Simply replant them in an area of your choosing.

The best chances for a successful time to replant your wisteria vine is late in the winter or early in the spring before the buds break open. Of course, if you are adventurous, you can try to transplant them during the other months.

Prepare the Planting Hole

Prepare the planting location for your wisteria. This helps cut down on the stress of the plant. Less stress means the wisteria vine will take off and grow. The planting area should have at least 6 hours of sunlight every day.

Dig the hole or holes, depending on how many you'll want to dig up and plant. Each hole should measure 2 to 3 feet across and be 2 feet deep. When the hole is dug, take the edge of your shovel or spade to scuff up the sides and bottom of the hole.

Fill the hole with water. Wait until the water drains out before you transplant the vine.

Amend the soil removed from the hole with 3 to 4 inches of compost. Use well-rotted compost because it helps with drainage and provides nutrients to the soil for your wisteria vine to grow.

Dig Out The Wisteria Shoot

Now it is time to dig out the wisteria shoot. Choose a healthy shoot that is 1 to 2 feet in height. Try to place the edge of your space or shovel a foot away from the rootball and then push the spade into the soil going all the way around the plant.

Carefully pry the root ball out of the ground, being try not to break the root ball.

Transplant the Wisteria

If you have to travel a distance, wrap the rootball in a tarp to keep the soil around the rootball intact.

Adjust the depth of your planting hole to match the height of the root ball. Insert the root ball into your planting hole. Check to make sure that the top of the root ball is level with the soil. Wisteria must be planted to the same depth as it was originally growing.

Fill in the hole around the root ball with the amended soil. Tamp the soil in place with your hands to eliminate any air pockets.

Give the wisteria vine a good drink of water. Keep the soil moist and soon your wisteria vine will take off and grow.

Content copyright © 2021 by Gail Delaney. All rights reserved.
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How do you transplant a wisteria plant?

Place the cut vines and leaves in a garbage bag or garden waste can for disposal. Dig a wide circle about 2 to 3 feet out from the main stem, using a spade to cut through the roots as you dig. Remove the soil to create a 6-inch-wide trench so you can access the roots. Set the soil aside.

Secondly, how deep do wisteria roots go? Dig a hole as deep as the root ball and 2 to 3 times as wide. Space plants 10 to 15 feet apart.

Also Know, can you grow wisteria from a cutting?

Taking Wisteria Cuttings Cuttings of wisteria need to be taken from the softwood. This is wood that is still green and has not developed woody bark. The cutting should be about 3 to 6 inches long and have at least two sets of leaves on the cutting. Wisteria cuttings root best if taken in late spring or early summer.

Can you over water wisteria?

Watering Wisteria. Water requirements can vary greatly from plant to plant, but there are some general guidelines you should follow. Once plants are established, water only during dry periods. During times of drought, water weekly until soil is completely moist.


How to Grow Wisteria

Last Updated: February 12, 2020 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Katie Gohmann. Katherine Gohmann is a Professional Gardener in Texas. She has been a home gardener and professional gardener since 2008.

There are 21 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

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Wisteria is a hearty woody vine that’s native to parts of North America and Asia. It’s recognized for its beautiful and scented hanging flower clusters, but the plant itself can grow very large and will even survive winter, frost, and snow. Wisteria needs lots of sun, water, and physical support to thrive, but as long as it has these things, it will grow well in many locations throughout the world. You can grow wisteria from seeds or from cuttings, but it’s possible that plants grown from seeds will take longer to bloom.


We have a wisteria that is 6 years old. It started blooming about 3 years ago with each year having more blooms than the previous. I know we have it growing on a trellis too small to hold a more mature plant. Can we move it to another location without damaging it or is it too late? Also this year there are many pods on the plant that I have left thru the winter. Are these seed pods and if so, can I pick them and plant the seeds? Will they eventually break open themselves?

You can move your wisteria. I would move it this spring before growth begins. Be prepared for a flowerless season or two as your plant re-establishes its root system. Another option would be to keep the plant in its current location, prune it back and install a bigger support. The pods on your plants are filled with seeds. You get the best results removing and planting the seeds from the dry pods in fall. Try removing the seeds from the existing pods. Soak the seeds in warm water for 24 hours and plant in a container or vacant space in the garden. Or test the seeds viability. Soak the seeds overnight, place on a damp paper towel, set inside a plastic bag, seal and store in a warm location. Check the seeds every week for several weeks keeping the paper towel moist. If seeds sprout you know they are viable. You can plant the sprouted seeds and those remaining on the plant. Or start new wisteria plants by layering a long stem or two.


How do you transplant a wisteria plant?

Place the cut vines and leaves in a garbage bag or garden waste can for disposal. Dig a wide circle about 2 to 3 feet out from the main stem, using a spade to cut through the roots as you dig. Remove the soil to create a 6-inch-wide trench so you can access the roots. Set the soil aside.

Furthermore, how deep do wisteria roots go? Dig a hole as deep as the root ball and 2 to 3 times as wide. Space plants 10 to 15 feet apart.

Secondly, can you grow wisteria from a cutting?

Taking Wisteria Cuttings Cuttings of wisteria need to be taken from the softwood. This is wood that is still green and has not developed woody bark. The cutting should be about 3 to 6 inches long and have at least two sets of leaves on the cutting. Wisteria cuttings root best if taken in late spring or early summer.

Can you over water wisteria?

Watering Wisteria. Water requirements can vary greatly from plant to plant, but there are some general guidelines you should follow. Once plants are established, water only during dry periods. During times of drought, water weekly until soil is completely moist.


Watch the video: How to grow a Wisteria from seed